Taiwanese Food . . . in Pictures

by Michael

Can I meaningfully describe a country’s food with just photos and captions?


Mmmmmm Dumplings (in Hualien).


The crowd waiting for the world’s best spicy pancake (in Hualien). The crispy pancakes were rolled around a soft boiled egg and a flavorful, spicy sauce. This was the kind of treat that you forget to take a picture of because you’re too excited.


The spicy pancake must be worth it. Just look at her face (and her dog).


Pork “ravioli” according to our hotel host. Wontons? (Hualien)


Bar beer.


I don’t know what they are called but they are tasty (and stuffed with taro or cream). Elizabeth disagreed and found them disappointing.


Barley dessert in Tainan. Surprisingly good.


Another Tainan dessert. Not as tasty, but cool photo. Best described as a gelatinous blob with balls of mango flavor.


Soup (Taipei).


Thai fight throwing pork. Don’t ask.


Noodles are super hot. Sad!


Varieties of fried mushrooms (Sun Moon Lake).


Mushrooms and Boba Tea (Sun Moon Lake).




Chicks man!


Is this a cartoon character? I don’t know but it was tasty.


Pineapple cake cat at Houtong Cat Village.


Taipei treats to go. Little flavored egg tarts.

Humm. The pictures don’t quite tell the story.

We enjoyed a lot of the food in Taiwan. The food was definitely Chinese, but distinct from Chinese food I’ve had in mainland China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, and the United States.

We had a wonderful time eating from street stands, many of which are set up in night markets (sometimes streets are closed to traffic for these markets, other times you walk carefully to dodge motorcycles). We did eventually get tired of fried foods. And there is a lot of pork, which I don’t normally eat. A bit more research probably could have given us more variety, and we did venture to a Burmese neighborhood for one unique dinner. But in the end we were ready for the comfort of food at home, including shopping at Trader Joe’s.

[This blog post shows our food in Taiwan, March 8-28, 2017.]

One thought on “Taiwanese Food . . . in Pictures

  1. Pingback: Time for Taiwan | two backpacks, no plan

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